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1322 Alginate Impression and Diagnostic Study Model Techniques (AGD 250)

1322 Alginate Impression and Diagnostic Study Model Techniques (AGD 250)

1322 Alginate Impression and Diagnostic Study Model Techniques (AGD 250)

Ellen Gambardella, CDA, M.Ed.; Rita Johnson, COA, RDH, MA
Ellen Gambardella, CDA, M.Ed.; Rita Johnson, COA, RDH, MA
on behalf of American Dental Assistants Association

$63.00 $ 63.00 $ 63.00

$63.00 $ 63.00 $ 63.00

$ 63.00 $ 63.00 $ 63.00
$ 63.00 $ 63.00 $ 63.00
Normal Price: $63.00 $63.00

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Launch date: 15 Aug 2016
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 06 Sep 2018

Reference: 164788

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Learn step–by–step procedures for taking alginate impressions. Discover alternatives for obtaining bite registrations, and ascertain various ways of creating study models. This comprehensive course combines theory with practical information on correct chairside and laboratory procedures and how to manipulate the dental materials involved. Highlights infection control including disinfection protocol, patient preparation, mixing techniques, alginate tray selection and preparation, use of adhesives, seating and removal of impression trays, inspection of impressions, bite registration techniques, gypsum, pouring casts, separating and trimming casts, and finishing and storage of models. Sponsored in part from an educational grant from DUX Dental.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:
Objective 1:
State at least four reasons for obtaining diagnostic study models.
Objective 2:
Compare and contrast what is meant by a positive reproduction versus negative reproduction of the oral cavity.
Objective 3:
Describe the properties of an irreversible hydrocolloid.
Objective 4:
List six characteristics desired for an ideal alginate impression material.
Objective5:
Define working time and setting time as these terms relate to working with alginate and gypsum products.
Objective 6:
Describe the effects of humidity on the spatulation and setting time of alginates and gypsum materials.
Objective 7:
Identify at least three reasons for the operator to wear Personal Protective Equipment. (PPE) while working with alginate and gypsum products.
Objective 8:
Explain the mechanisms for disinfecting alginate impressions, including the recommended types of disinfectants and time required.
Objective 9:
Explain the purpose of chromatic agents in the powder of some alginates.
Objective 10:
List all supplies needed for obtaining an alginate impression.
Objective 11:
Explain the rationale for instructing the patient to rinse with a mouthwash prior to taking the alginate impression.
Objective 12:
Identify the different varieties of impression trays available for use in dentistry.
Objective 13:
Discuss the guidelines used in impression tray selection.
Objective 14:
Describe the purpose of adhesives prior to loading the impression tray with alginate.
Objective 15:
Identify three reasons for using utility/beading wax on the periphery of impression trays.
Objective 16:
Describe the rationale for obtaining the mandibular impression prior to the maxillary impression.
Objective 17:
Identify three mechanisms available for mixing alginate material.
Objective 18:
Comment on the purpose for “lufing” the alginate powder prior to use.
Objective 19:
Differentiate between a smooth vs. a grainy mix of alginate material and what precautions should be taken for insuring a homogeneous consistency.
Objective 20:
Describe how to load a mandibular impression tray with alginate.
Objective 21:
Describe how to load a maxillary impression tray with alginate.
Objective 22:
Explain how to seat a mandibular impression including the patient and operator positions.
Objective 23:
Explain how to seat a maxillary impression including the patient and operator positions.
Objective 24:
Describe the appropriate mandibular impression removal technique.
Objective 25:
Describe the appropriate mandibular impression removal technique.
Objective 26:
Comment on what is meant by the impression inspection.
Objective 27:
Elaborate on the protocol for impression storage.
Objective 28:
Explain the purpose of a bite registration.
Objective 29:
List three means of obtaining a bite registration.
Objective 30:
State six desirable characteristics required of gypsum products.
Objective 31:
Define accelerators and retarders as applicable to gypsum products.
Objective 32:
Name four examples of accelerators.
Objective 33:
Name four examples of retarders.
Objective 34:
List all supplies needed in order to pour diagnostic study models.
Objective 35:
Describe what is meant by a W/P ratio of 50:100.
Objective 36:
Explain the rationale for gradually sifting the plaster powder into the water in the mixing bowl.
Objective 37:
Elaborate on the rationale for using the vibrator on the mixed gypsum product.
Objective 38:
Describe the technique for filling the teeth in the impression with plaster.
Objective 39:
Differentiate between the anatomical portion and the base portion of the study model.
Objective 40:
Identify and describe four methods of forming a study model base.
Objective 41:
Cite the precise W/P ratio for the anatomical portion verses the base portion of the study model and explain the rationale for the difference.
Objective 42:
Describe the separation procedure that should be followed to remove a cast from the impression and detail the necessary precautions that should be taken.
Objective 43:
State the purposes for trimming the study models.
Objective 44:
Explain the rationale for wearing PPE while using the model trimmer.
Objective 45:
Describe the trimming procedure for the maxillary model including the appropriate angles engineered for the Tweed vs. the Ricketts technique.
Objective 46:
Elaborate on the trimming procedure for the mandibular cast including appropriate angulation.
Objective 47:
Explain why we simultaneously cut the “heels” of the mandibular and maxillary casts.
Objective 48:
Describe the sanding technique used for finishing diagnostic study models.
Objective 49:
Differentiate between two acceptable polishing techniques for finished casts.
Objective 50:
Identify two means of labeling diagnostic casts.
Objective 51:
Discuss the proper storage of study models.
Ellen Gambardella, CDA, M.Ed.; Rita Johnson, COA, RDH, MA

Author Information Play Video Bio

Ellen Gambardella, CDA, M.Ed.; Rita Johnson, COA, RDH, MA
on behalf of American Dental Assistants Association

Ellen Gambardella, CDA, M.Ed.
In a nationwide search, Ellen was selected as the “Most Effective Dental Assistant Educator in the United States”. The Massachusetts Dental Society presented her with the “Special Award for Teacher of the Year” and in 2012 the “Volunteer Auxiliary of the Year” award. She is the recipient of the Goldin Foundation Award for Excellence in Education and the Dr. LeClaire Dental Health Professional Award for innovative and impassioned teaching. The United States Air Force recognized Ellen for her educational support of the 66th Dental Flight and Medical Group. She has been appointed by the Massachusetts Department of Education to develop Dental Assisting teacher licensing examinations. A former faculty member of Tufts and Northeastern Universities, Ellen has lectured nationally and internationally, is an author, and has vast experience in the area of accelerated learning. She has been featured in The Dental Assistant Journal on “Maximizing Efficiency in the Dental Office”.

Rita Johnson, COA, RDH, MA
Rita Johnson, COA, RDH, MA, is a former treatment coordinator in a private orthodontic practice and a former professor at Middlesex Community College, where she received the Outstanding Faculty Recognition Award. Rita is also the recipient of the “Volunteer Contributions for Auxiliaries” award, given by the Massachusetts Dental Society. Rita worked at Brontes Technologies, where she was involved in the research and development of digital orthodontics. She is currently employed by 3M Unitek, where she serves as an Incognito™System Practice Specialist. Rita has written RDH curriculum, authored articles, patented orthodontic products, and has vast experience in the area of practice management.

The editor wishes to thank Michael Durda of Dux Dental for his countless hours editing portions of this manuscript and supplying photographs.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Academy of General Dentistry (PACE)
  • 4.00 Hours -
    Reference: AGD 250

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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