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Veterinary Interventional Oncology

Veterinary Interventional Oncology

Veterinary Interventional Oncology

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

$ FREE $ FREE $ FREE

$ FREE $ FREE $ FREE
$ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00
Normal Price: FREE $ 25.00

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Launch date: 17 Apr 2015

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Duration: 0h 45m
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Description

Surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are well-established treatment modalities for veterinary oncologic patients. In the last several years, the use of minimally invasive diagnostics and treatments has experienced tremendous growth in veterinary medicine, especially in the field of oncology. Specifically, the specialty of Interventional Radiology (IR), which uses image guidance to allow for performance of minimally invasive procedures, is becoming an integral component in the treatment plans for many veterinary patients. Interventional Oncology (IO), which involves the use of IR techniques specifically for the treatment of cancer, is a rapidly developing field and may offer treatment options for patients, where none previously existed.
The potential for IO to benefit our veterinary patients is vast and many of the procedures that are now offered for our patients have been previously established as standard-of-care in human medicine. The specialty of IR has many applications in the treatment of both benign and malignant disease. Most of the current oncologic treatment options fall into the categories of stenting of obstructive lesions, vascular therapies to treat non-resectable malignancies and ablative therapies. Reports of the outcomes experienced with these therapies, while limited, are showing promise. Many patients demonstrate a significant improvement in quality of life, and our knowledge of the potential of these treatments is increasing as we further learn from each case. Many other potential treatment options exist, and as experience is gained, the IO procedures offered to our veterinary patients will likely grow as well.
While therapies such as urethral stenting, intra-arterial chemotherapy for lower urinary tract neoplasia, and hepatic transarterial embolization are being performed regularly at some clinics, other options are rapidly emerging. Tumors that are drawing particular focus include those that generally have poor long-term control options or those that lack other existing options. Local delivery of chemotherapy and embolic agents to tumors of the nasal cavity and prostate are developing, and active research is ongoing to determine the safety and efficacy of these procedures amongst others. Ablative techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have been pursued for years in human patients, and more detailed evaluation of these techniques needs to be performed in our veterinary patients, as initial results are promising.
As advancements are made in IO diagnostics and equipment, it is likely that the opportunities to utilize these techniques will increase and this will alter the treatment regimens that are pursued. As with all specialties, the need for rigorous scientific evaluation of IO therapies is crucial. Currently, supporting literature is lacking for many IO procedures, but results achieved in small cohorts of cases have been promising and have laid the foundation for the pursuit of larger scale projects. The collaborative efforts of medical, radiation and surgical oncologists, as well as other specialties, have made many of the above IO treatments possible, and this continued collaboration will be the reason that further IO advancements are made in the treatment of veterinary patients. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are well-established treatment modalities for veterinary oncologic patients. In the last several years, the use of minimally invasive diagnostics and treatments has experienced tremendous growth in veterinary medicine, especially in the field of oncology. Specifically, the specialty of Interventional Radiology (IR), which uses image guidance to allow for performance of minimally invasive procedures, is becoming an integral component in the treatment plans for many veterinary patients. Interventional Oncology (IO), which involves the use of IR techniques specifically for the treatment of cancer, is a rapidly developing field and may offer treatment options for patients, where none previously existed.
The potential for IO to benefit our veterinary patients is vast and many of the procedures that are now offered for our patients have been previously established as standard-of-care in human medicine. The specialty of IR has many applications in the treatment of both benign and malignant disease. Most of the current oncologic treatment options fall into the categories of stenting of obstructive lesions, vascular therapies to treat non-resectable malignancies and ablative therapies. Reports of the outcomes experienced with these therapies, while limited, are showing promise. Many patients demonstrate a significant improvement in quality of life, and our knowledge of the potential of these treatments is increasing as we further learn from each case. Many other potential treatment options exist, and as experience is gained, the IO procedures offered to our veterinary patients will likely grow as well.
While therapies such as urethral stenting, intra-arterial chemotherapy for lower urinary tract neoplasia, and hepatic transarterial embolization are being performed regularly at some clinics, other options are rapidly emerging. Tumors that are drawing particular focus include those that generally have poor long-term control options or those that lack other existing options. Local delivery of chemotherapy and embolic agents to tumors of the nasal cavity and prostate are developing, and active research is ongoing to determine the safety and efficacy of these procedures amongst others. Ablative techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have been pursued for years in human patients, and more detailed evaluation of these techniques needs to be performed in our veterinary patients, as initial results are promising.
As advancements are made in IO diagnostics and equipment, it is likely that the opportunities to utilize these techniques will increase and this will alter the treatment regimens that are pursued. As with all specialties, the need for rigorous scientific evaluation of IO therapies is crucial. Currently, supporting literature is lacking for many IO procedures, but results achieved in small cohorts of cases have been promising and have laid the foundation for the pursuit of larger scale projects. The collaborative efforts of medical, radiation and surgical oncologists, as well as other specialties, have made many of the above IO treatments possible, and this continued collaboration will be the reason that further IO advancements are made in the treatment of veterinary patients.

Objectives

Objectives
The use of minimally invasive diagnostics and treatments has experienced tremendous growth in veterinary medicine, especially in the field of oncology. Specifically, the specialty of Interventional Radiology (IR), which uses image guidance to allow for performance of minimally invasive procedures, is becoming an integral component in the treatment plans for many veterinary patients. Interventional Oncology (IO), which involves the use of IR techniques specifically for the treatment of cancer, is
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. William Culp graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine. After graduation from veterinary school, he remained at the University of Pennsylvania to complete a rotating internship in small animal medicine and surgery followed by a surgical residency. Dr. Culp is board-certified as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, and he has pursued additional training in cancer surgery at the Colorado State University Animal Cancer Center, during which he completed a Surgical Oncology Fellowship. Additionally, he has completed an Interventional Radiology/Endoscopy Fellowship at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Culp was selected as an ACVS Founding Fellow of Surgical Oncology in 2012. Dr. Culp is currently a member of the Soft Tissue Surgery service at the University of California - Davis. He is interested in many areas of soft tissue surgery, but his major. focuses are surgical oncology and interventional radiology. The specialty of surgical oncology focuses on utilizing advanced surgical techniques in the treatment of cancer. Interventional radiology is a rapidly developing specialty in veterinary medicine that utilizes diagnostic imaging modalities to diagnose and treat diseases in veterinary patients in a minimally invasive manner. Combining these two specialties allows for advanced, minimally invasive treatments to be pursued for veterinary cancer and non-cancer patients.

Current Accreditations

This e-learning has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 1.00 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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