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Tumor Imaging: From Genetically Engineered Mice to Canine Patients

Tumor Imaging: From Genetically Engineered Mice to Canine Patients

Tumor Imaging: From Genetically Engineered Mice to Canine Patients

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

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Launch date: 15 Apr 2015

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Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Duration: 0h 45m
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Description

Genetically engineered mice can be used to study cancer in autochthonous tumors, which develop at an orthotopic site within a native microenvironment. These models provide elegant systems for dissecting mechanisms of tumor development, progression and response to therapy. In this presentation, I will present an overview of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and describe how we have developed spatially and temporally-restricted mouse models of cancer in which a primary tumor develops at a defined site within a narrow window of time. We have utilized these mouse models for novel surgical, imaging, and radiation therapy studies. In this presentation, I will highlight various imaging studies we have completed with imaging scientists. I will describe how we have imaged primary sarcomas with gold nanoparticles to study the impact of radiation therapy on tumor vasculature using dual energy micro-CT. Moreover, I will present our work utilizing genetically engineered mice and imaging to dissect mechanisms of normal tissue injury from radiation therapy. For example, we have utilized cardiac echocardiography, 4D-micro-CT, and micro-SPECT to study mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease in mice. Finally, I will present our collaboration with engineers to develop novel intraoperative imaging technology to image microscopic residual cancer with optical molecular imaging. This technology is now being tested in clinical trials in canine and human patients with cancer.

Objectives

Objectives
In this presentation, I will present an overview of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and describe how we have developed spatially and temporally-restricted mouse models of cancer in which a primary tumor develops at a defined site within a narrow window of time. We have utilized these mouse models for novel surgical, imaging, and radiation therapy studies.
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. David Kirsch, MD, PhD, is Associate Professor in Radiation Oncology and in Pharmacology & Cancer Biology at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Kirsch graduated from Duke University with a BS in Biology and then completed the MD/PhD program at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he completed his thesis research in the laboratory of Michael Kastan. After an internship in Internal Medicine, Dr. Kirsch trained in radiation oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He also worked as a post-doc in the laboratory of Tyler Jacks at M.I.T., where he developed a genetically engineered mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma. After residency, Dr. Kirsch was a faculty member at Harvard and treated sarcoma patients at Massachusetts General Hospital. In 2007 Dr. Kirsch moved to Duke, where he cares for patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas at the Duke Cancer Center. Dr. Kirsch is the co-leader of the Radiation Oncology & Imaging Program in the Duke Cancer Institute. He serves as the radiation oncology co-chair for the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group phase II trial of Imaged-Guided Radiation Therapy for soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity. Dr. Kirsch’s laboratory utilizes genetically engineered mouse models of soft tissue sarcoma to study sarcoma development, metastasis, and novel therapies. In addition, his lab uses mouse genetics to study radiation biology.

Current Accreditations

This e-learning has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 0.50 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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