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Stereotactic Radiosurgery for BrainTumors

Stereotactic Radiosurgery for BrainTumors

Stereotactic Radiosurgery for BrainTumors

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

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Launch date: 14 Apr 2015

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Duration: 0h 30m
Exam is embedded in the e-learning
No Exam Available

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Description

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a radiation therapy technique using a high dose of very conformal radiation delivered to a target in a single fraction. Stereotactic radiotherapy is the same procedure done in multiple fractions. The dose given is in theory high enough to ablate the treated area, hence the use of the word “surgery” even though there is no surgical procedure. Advanced imaging, patient fixation devices, treatment planning software, a machine to deliver the radiation, strict quality assurance procedures and on board imaging are required for stereotactic radiosurgery.
Most commonly gamma radiation or photons are used for SRS with several different types of machines used, including linear accelerators and the Gamma Knife. The principal of stereotaxis uses the Cartesian coordinate system to localize the target (tumor) to an external frame to allow increased accuracy and precision in targeting, although more recently frameless systems have been developed.
Planning for SRS is done on imaging data obtained from the CT scan, which can be combined with MRI imaging for better soft tissue delineation. There are multiple different planning systems available depending on the treatment system being used. The image sets are imported and fused in the software and treatment planning is then begun. The goals of treatment planning are to create high dose gradients at the edge of the planning target volume of the tumor. Precision and accuracy are required in patient positioning to ensure that the planned treatment is delivered correctly. The patient is imaged and positioned for treatment in the same device, with imaging repeated on the treatment machine to ensure correct positioning right before dose delivery. The quality assurance required for SRS is more rigorous than for other types of radiation given the small margins and high doses used.
Multiple types of intracranial tumors have been treated in the dog using SRS including meningiomas, gliomas, pituitary tumors, peripheral nerve sheath tumors and metastatic lesions. There is still limited published data on outcomes for most tumor types although survival times between traditional radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery appear similar for most types. For others, refinement of techniques and fractionation schemes may be needed to achieve tumor control.

Objectives

Objectives
Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a radiation therapy technique using a high dose of very conformal radiation delivered to a target in a single fraction. Stereotactic radiotherapy is the same procedure done in multiple fractions. The dose given is in theory high enough to ablate the treated area, hence the use of the word “surgery” even though there is no surgical procedure. Advanced imaging, patient fixation devices, treatment planning software, a machine to deliver the radiation, strict quali
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Michael Kent is an associate professor at UC Davis. He is co-director of the comparative Cancer Center and Acting Director of the Center for Companion Animal Health. He graduated from The UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine in 1997. He then went on to do an internship at the University of Pennsylvania and was then in private practice in Pennsylvania for one year before going on to do residencies in both Medical and Radiation Oncology at UC Davis where he also received his masters degree in clinical research. He is boarded in both medical and radiation oncology. Dr. Kent’s research interests include innovative radiotherapy techniques and mechanisms of disease in melanoma, lymphoma and osteosarcoma.

Current Accreditations

This e-learning has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 0.50 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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