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One Cancer, Two Species, Many Options: State of the Art Sarcoma Treatment in Dogs and Humans

One Cancer, Two Species, Many Options: State of the Art Sarcoma Treatment in Dogs and Humans

One Cancer, Two Species, Many Options: State of the Art Sarcoma Treatment in Dogs and Humans

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

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Launch date: 14 Apr 2015

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Duration: 0h 30m
Exam is embedded in the e-learning
No Exam Available

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Description

This presentation provides a broad comparison of how sarcomas are currently treated in dogs and in humans. While the goal of surgery remains consistent across species – namely to achieve a margin-negative resection of the tumor in order to obtain local control – there is considerable debate about how this goal is accomplished. How wide of a margin is wide enough? What is the role of tumor biology with regard to selecting the right “dose” of surgery? What adjuvant treatments should be employed? It is this last question – What Adjuvant? – that offers the sharpest contrast in practice between human medicine and veterinary medicine.

Whereas the use of adjuvant radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy are somewhat subjective in veterinary practice, clear lines are drawn when treating humans with sarcoma:
1) Chemotherapy is the adjuvant of choice when treating sarcomas of bone
2) Radiation therapy is the adjuvant of choice when treating soft tissue sarcomas.

Objectives

Objectives
This presentation provides a broad comparison of how sarcomas are currently treated in dogs and in humans. While the goal of surgery remains consistent across species – namely to achieve a margin-negative resection of the tumor in order to obtain local control – there is considerable debate about how this goal is accomplished. How wide of a margin is wide enough? What is the role of tumor biology with regard to selecting the right “dose” of surgery? What adjuvant treatments should be employed? I
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Will Eward: After completing undergraduate studies at Duke University, Will Eward graduated from the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2000, fulfilling a lifelong dream. In keeping with his plans to study comparative, interspecies medicine, he then completed an MD degree at the University of Vermont in 2006. With thoughts of One Medicine in the forefront of his mind, he decided on a career in orthopaedic oncology. An orthopaedic surgery residency at Duke and a surgical oncology fellowship at the University of Toronto completed the formal training. He currently spends his time as a surgical oncologist at Duke University and the Veterinary Specialty Hospital of the Carolinas.

Current Accreditations

This e-learning has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 0.50 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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