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Comparative Development Approach to Novel Imaging Technologies

Comparative Development Approach to Novel Imaging Technologies

Comparative Development Approach to Novel Imaging Technologies

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

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Launch date: 14 Apr 2015

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Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Duration: 0h 30m
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Description

Advanced molecular imaging techniques, which measure biologic processes at the cellular level, are quickly becoming commonplace in physician-based oncology and have the potential to play an important role in the tailoring of cancer therapy in veterinary patients. Advanced imaging modalities have several applications, including the early detection of cancer, more accurate staging of cancer, determination of response to therapy (including prediction of long-term prognosis) and early detection of cancer recurrence. Further, advanced imaging modalities that provide information on the functional properties of tumors, including metabolic rate, proliferative status, presence of receptors and tumor associated antigens, and vascularity is now within our grasp. Additionally, with the development and availability of advanced image-modulated radiation therapy delivery devices (e.g., tomotherapy, stereotactic radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery), the co-development of advanced imaging technologies are critical in order to take advantage of these advancements.

Applying a comparative approach to the development of novel tumor (and tumor microenvironment) imaging technologies carries many of the same advantages theorized for the comparative development approach used in novel anticancer therapeutics. The term comparative oncology can be used to describe a discipline that integrates the study of naturally occurring cancers in animals into studies of human cancer biology and therapy. The term is most often used when referring to the study of cancers seen in companion (pet) animals. Cancers in companion species are well suited to uniquely inform investigations of cancer biology, drug development and, in the context of this discussion, the development novel imaging technologies. Patient size allows the use of imaging hardware designed for humans to be readily used with or adapted to companion species. Conversely, imaging instruments (including beta units) developed using large animal companion species can often be readily adapted for human use. Cancers in companion species share many important biologic processes with cancers in people making the transfer of imaging technologies and image-assisted assessment of biologically and therapeutically relevant processes theoretically and practically possible and indeed advantageous. Advances using the comparative approach are not limited to the development of new imaging hardware and software. Investigations of novel imaging agents that may preferentially target tumors or assess any number of tumor related properties (e.g., signal transduction pathways, energy metabolism, presence of and targeting of tumor associated antigens, tumor perfusion) theoretically could be investigated and beta-tested in tumor bearing companion species in order to inform their further development and application in humans. Further, as anesthesia or heavy sedation is often necessary for imaging in companion species, repeated tissue or biospecimen sampling can more readily be procured for correlations between image capture and biomarkers providing validation of non-invasive functional or treatment response information.
Several examples of the comparative approach to novel imaging technologies will be presented.

Objectives

Objectives
Advanced molecular imaging techniques, which measure biologic processes at the cellular level, are quickly becoming commonplace in physician-based oncology and have the potential to play an important role in the tailoring of cancer therapy in veterinary patients. Advanced imaging modalities have several applications, including the early detection of cancer, more accurate staging of cancer, determination of response to therapy (including prediction of long-term prognosis) and early detection of c
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. David Vail received his DVM from the University of Saskatchewan in 1984 and subsequently completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at Colorado State University prior to practicing in his native western Canada for two years. He followed up with a residency in Medical Oncology at the Animal Cancer Center at Colorado State University, completed in 1990. He is currently Professor and Barbara A. Suran Chair in Comparative Oncology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a member of the UW Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Vail has published over 120 peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts and 50 book chapters in the field of veterinary and comparative oncology. David is co-editor of the textbook Small Animal Clinical Oncology and currently serves as President-Elect for the Veterinary Cancer Society. He is the past Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Boards for both the Morris Animal Foundation and the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Foundation, past President of the Canine Comparative Oncology and Genomics Consortium (CCOGC), a founding member of the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC) and past North American Journal Editor for Veterinary and Comparative Oncology. He has been honored as the recipient of both the Mark L. Morris Sr. Distinguished Research Award and the Pfizer Award for Veterinary Research Excellence.

Current Accreditations

This e-learning has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 0.50 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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