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Helical Tomotherapy=New Options in Radiotherapy

Helical Tomotherapy=New Options in Radiotherapy

Helical Tomotherapy=New Options in Radiotherapy

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

$FREE $ FREE $ FREE

$ FREE $ FREE $ FREE
$ 12.50 $ 12.50 $ 12.50
Normal Price: FREE $12.50

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Launch date: 14 Apr 2015

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 18 Oct 2017

Reference: 150472

Exam is embedded in the course
No Exam Available

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Radiation therapy plays an important role in the optimal multimodality management of veterinary cancer patients. Treatment planning and ultimately delivery is often complicated by the presence of sensitive critical (avoidance) structures adjacent to primary target volumes (tumor). Improvements in treatment planning and delivery strategies have evolved from conventional to 3D conformal to intensity modulated with the associated technologies becoming more readily available in veterinary medicine. Helical tomotherapy represents an innovative approach in the delivery of conformal radiation in veterinary patients.
As the first system designed specifically for the delivery of image-guided and intensity modulated radiation therapy, the tomotherapy delivery system is a hybridization combining features of a conventional linear accelerator (linac) and a helical computed tomography (CT) scanner. In contrast to a standard linac, the waveguide is mounted on a ring style gantry generating a fan-shaped beam which is rotated around the patient as the animal is translated through the bore (pitch). Helical tomotherapy modulates field intensities using a binary multileaf collimator with 64 leaves that project to 0.625 cm wide at the machine isocenter. The delivery system is also equipped with an online megavoltage CT detector which not only permits patient position verification but also reconstruction of delivered dose.
These unique features of helical tomotherapy allow for implementation of image-guided IMRT strategies that were previously impossible or impractical with conventional delivery units. By altering the leaf open and close times with the inclusion of the helical pitch, there is an increase in the degrees of freedom, thus providing great flexibility in the creation of complex dose geometries and distributions while sparing normal tissues. In situations where distant metastasis has not occurred, dose escalation strategies such as an integrated simultaneous boost or dose redistribution to local and loco-regional disease may improve control and survival while maintaining a similar or improved toxicity profile.
In addition, a new potential exists for the treatment of extended volumes in the cranial-caudal direction without the need for beam junctioning or increased plan complexity. These capabilities would allow integration of lymphoid management strategies such as total and partial lymphoid irradiation or advanced involved field or node techniques for hematological and non-hematological malignancies. For advanced stage mammary carcinoma patients with node positive disease, or patients with brain tumors at risk for dissemination through the cerebrospinal fluid, radiotherapy may now be considered as the technical challenges are minimized. This capability would also allow for us to redefine prior or explore new areas such as marrow-only or total body irradiation preconditioning regimes for malignant and benign diseases, all while reducing radiation dose to the lungs, heart, eyes, kidneys and other internal organs.

Objectives

Objectives
Radiation therapy plays an important role in the optimal multimodality management of veterinary cancer patients. Treatment planning and ultimately delivery is often complicated by the presence of sensitive critical (avoidance) structures adjacent to primary target volumes (tumor). Improvements in treatment plan and delivery strategies have evolved from conventional to 3D conformal to intensity modulated with the associated technologies becoming more readily available in veterinary medicine. Heli
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Michael Deveau is an assistant professor in the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University. He received his DVM from Kansas State University in 2005 and subsequently completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the Veterinary Referral and Emergency Center in Norwalk, Connecticut. He followed up with a residency in Radiation Oncology (2008) and M.Sc. in Medical Physics (2010) from the Schools of Veterinary Medicine and Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has a broad background in medical physics with extensive training and expertise in radiotherapeutic applications and strategies utilizing helical tomotherapy in veterinary companion animals.
mdeveau@cvm.tamu.edu

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 0.50 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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