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Therapeutic potential of targeting Wnt signaling pathways in cancer

Therapeutic potential of targeting Wnt signaling pathways in cancer

Therapeutic potential of targeting Wnt signaling pathways in cancer

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

$FREE $ FREE $ FREE

$12.50 $ 12.50 $ 12.50

$ FREE $ FREE $ FREE
$ 12.50 $ 12.50 $ 12.50
Normal Price: FREE $12.50

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Launch date: 29 Oct 2015
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Reference: 161526

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Therapeutic potential of targeting Wnt signaling pathways in cancer The Wnt signaling pathways are integral to the normal development of multiple cell types and dysregulation has been implicated in numerous cancer types. This talk will focus on the canonical (β-catenin dependent) and non-canonical (β-catenin independent) branches of the Wnt signaling pathway and their associations with cancer development, including cancers in companion animals. The potential and limitations of targeting the Wnt signaling pathways for the treatment of cancer will be discussed.

Objectives

The attendee should be able to:
• describe the main difference between the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways;
• understand positive and negative regulators of the canonical Wnt pathway; and
• be aware of potential side effects that have been documented with therapy suppressing the canonical Wnt pathway.
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Tim Stein is an assistant professor at UW-Madison and serves as the section head of medical oncology at UW Veterinary Care. Dr. Stein’s area of research is on the impact of Wnt signaling abnormalities in cancer development and progression, with specific interest in liver cancer, melanoma, and osteosarcoma. As a veterinary oncologist, he is interested in using spontaneously-occurring cancer in domestic animals as a model for human cancers, especially for osteosarcoma and malignant melanoma. Dr. Stein completed his DVM at Iowa State University, his PhD and medical oncology residency at UW-Madison

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 1.00 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

Faculty and Disclosures

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Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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