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IVECCS MDR 2017: Adverse Effects of Fluids

IVECCS MDR 2017: Adverse Effects of Fluids

IVECCS MDR 2017: Adverse Effects of Fluids

Deborah Silverstein, BA, BS, DVM, DACVECC
Deborah Silverstein, BA, BS, DVM, DACVECC
on behalf of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society

$40.00 $ 40.00 $ 40.00

$FREE $ FREE $ FREE

$ 40.00 $ 40.00 $ 40.00
$ FREE $ FREE $ FREE
Normal Price: $40.00 FREE

Review:

Launch date: 23 Jan 2018
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 04 Dec 2018

Reference: 186176

This course is no longer available

Exam is embedded in the course
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No Exam Available

Latest User Comments

Ms Holly Killian CVT (8 Nov 2018)
A lot of information in 1 hour. The speaker started to talk faster as the hour progressed, making it more difficult to follow.
bryan hall (27 Sep 2018)
If multiple people that the course is intended for can not pass the exam, it is a reflection of the either the presenter not teaching what they wanted to be tested or the exam not testing what was intended to be taught. Very frustrating. We are brighter than this. I did learn despite the test.
Mary Giles (24 Nov 2018)
Very very technical, which is good in a way, but it would be better if clinical relevance was emphasized more.

I would like to...

Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Intravenous fluids are drugs. Like any medication, the potential benefits should always be weighed in light of the possible adverse effects. It is important to realize that the clinical context of a given fluid therapy plan is key to its success or failure. A given fluid strategy that has been proven to benefit one clinical population may lead to increased morbidity in another. Subsequently, recommendations for fluid therapy should be tailored to a tightly defined clinical groups of patients and the stage of their disease process. It is for this reason that fluid prescription must be varied with regards to indications, contraindications and dose ranges based on the individual patient in order to decrease the associated adverse effects. This lecture will review the following:
1. Normal body fluid physiology
2. Critical illness and fluid homeostasis
3. Three major adverse effects of fluids
a. Acid-base derangements.
b. Acute kidney injury
c. Interstitial edema
Although there are many more potential adverse effects of fluid therapy, including thrombophlebitis, hypothermia, coagulopathy and embolism, these will not be discussed in detail in order to focus on the pathophysiology of the aforementioned effects.

Objectives

Understand normal body fluid physiology
Understand the compartmentalization of fluids in the body and the movement of fluids, electrolytes and macromolecules between compartments. Learn the modified Starling equation and the significance of the endothelial glycocalyx layer.
Understand the derangements in fluid homeostasis in critical illness
Learn the changes in fluid homeostasis secondary to many types of critical illness. Understand both the causes as well as the sequelae of these derangements.
Learn the link between fluid therapy and acute kidney injury
Understand how intravenous fluids can cause acute kidney injury and the causative mechanisms. Both unbalanced crystalloids and synthetic colloids will be the focus.
Understand the mechanism of acid-base derangements
Learn the potential acid-base derangements that can occur secondary to fluid therapy and how they might affect critically ill patients.
Learn how interstitial edema may result from fluid therapy
Understand how fluid therapy can precipitate interstitial edema and its significance in the pathophysiology of organ dysfunction in critically ill animals.
Deborah Silverstein, BA, BS, DVM, DACVECC

Author Information Play Video Bio

Deborah Silverstein, BA, BS, DVM, DACVECC
on behalf of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society

Associate Professor of Critical Care BA, BS, DVM (Univ of Georgia), DACVECC (Univ of CA, Davis) Interests: shock, SIRS/sepsis, fluid therapy, vasopressor therapy, microcirculatory blood flow and perfusion, resuscitation

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • AAVSB-Registry of Approved Continuing Education (RACE)
  • 1.00 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 70

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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User Reviews (11)

Go Back
Ms Holly Killian CVT (8 Nov 2018)
A lot of information in 1 hour. The speaker started to talk faster as the hour progressed, making it more difficult to follow.
bryan hall (27 Sep 2018)
If multiple people that the course is intended for can not pass the exam, it is a reflection of the either the presenter not teaching what they wanted to be tested or the exam not testing what was intended to be taught. Very frustrating. We are brighter than this. I did learn despite the test.
Mary Giles (24 Nov 2018)
Very very technical, which is good in a way, but it would be better if clinical relevance was emphasized more.
chris olortegui (24 Apr 2018)
very in depth lecture
liz stewart (22 Oct 2018)
good information but presented way to fast
Naomi Hansen (21 Jun 2018)
The course was quite informative but I found the questions at the end difficult to answer despite reviewing the course material on three occasions
Mary Ramirez (2 May 2018)
More technical than practical. Exam was extremely challenging. I watched the presentation 3 times and still couldn't pass the exam with a 70%
Dr Jacqueline Myers DVM (2 Dec 2018)
Wayyy too much detail for a GP.
(2 Dec 2018)
This course was really tough to follow. A lot of info presented very rapidly and the test was made more difficult by having multiple facts within each question.
Dr Kathryn Downie DVM (19 Jun 2018)
This course was a little over-technical in a biochem way. It was not as practical as I was hoping.
Dr Era Jo Moorer (1 Jun 2018)
Good information.

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