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 Liquid gold in precision medicine: Liquid-based biopsies for cancer detection and monitoring

 Liquid gold in precision medicine: Liquid-based biopsies for cancer detection and monitoring

 Liquid gold in precision medicine: Liquid-based biopsies for cancer detection and monitoring

Veterinary Cancer Society - Dr. Andrew Godwin
Veterinary Cancer Society - Dr. Andrew Godwin
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

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Launch date: 31 Dec 2018
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 27 Feb 2019

Reference: 193181

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

A liquid biopsy is a minimally or non-invasive technology that detects molecular biomarkers in the bloodstream or other bodily fluids without the need for costly or invasive procedures. These tests offer considerable potential in oncology, which includes early detection of cancer, treatment and recurrence monitoring, and as surrogates for traditional biopsies. A single liquid biopsy can offer the opportunity to systematically track genomic evolution. Liquid biopsy biomarkers include circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cell-free DNA (cfDNA), and extracellular vesicles (EVs). CTCs are known to have prognostic significance in various different tumor types, e.g., metastatic breast, metastatic castration-resistant prostate, and metastatic colorectal. cfDNA result from the release of dead tumor cells or fragments engulfed by phagocytes and processed into small nucleic acid fragments, which are then released into the bloodstream. A number of highly sensitive methods have been developed to detect aberrations found in circulating tumor DNA. EVs are nano-sized vesicles of endocytic origin also known as exosomes, which are produced and released by most cells types under normal physiologic and in diseased states. Exosomes are informative biological molecules that carry cargo representative of their originating cell including nucleic acids, cytokines, membrane-bound receptors, and a wide assortment of other, biologically active lipids and proteins. This cargo remains functional upon entry or fusion with a recipient cell. Thus, exosomal transfer is now considered an important form of intercellular communication in normal and pathological states such as cancer. Ways to exploit CTCs, cfDNA, and exosomes for cancer diagnostics and prognosis and the use of miniaturized biomedical assays will be discussed.

Objectives

Learning Objectives
• Develop an understanding of the type and role of biomarkers in precision cancer medicine.
• Understand the current activities in liquid-based biopsies to diagnose cancer, track disease progression, and monitor response to therapy.
Veterinary Cancer Society - Dr. Andrew Godwin

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society - Dr. Andrew Godwin
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Veterinary Cancer Society Dr. Andrew Godwin
Dr. Andrew K. Godwin, Ph.D., Director of Molecular Oncology at the Kansas University Medical Center will review the promise and current applications of circulating tumor cell technologies (liquid biopsies) and whether they will allow for earlier diagnosis of small tumors, provide crucial evidence regarding drug resistance, or determine at a point where that resistance is reversible.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 1.00 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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