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The Dog Aging Project: An Open Science Resource for Cancer Research

The Dog Aging Project: An Open Science Resource for Cancer Research

The Dog Aging Project: An Open Science Resource for Cancer Research

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

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$ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00
Normal Price: FREE $25.00

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Launch date: 02 Feb 2018

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 08 Feb 2018

Reference: 186892

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Long-term longitudinal studies of aging in humans have taught us a tremendous amount about the environmental and genetic risk factors for a wide range of diseases. But for most of these diseases, including cancer, by far the greatest risk is not genes or the environment, but age itself. For many diseases, the effect of age on risk is orders of magnitude greater than all other known risk factors combined. Thus, many researchers study the basic mechanisms of aging in the hope of understanding the underlying mechanisms that lead to this dramatic increase in risk of disease with age. Given the tremendous diversity among breeds not only in morphology and behavior, but also in patterns of age-related morbidity and mortality, companion dogs offer us an unprecedented opportunity to understand how and why genes, environment and age all combine to shape risks of age-related diseases. With this in mind, The Dog Aging Project (http://www.dogagingproject.com) is dedicated to developing the companion dog as a powerful model both to identify the genetic and environmental determinants of healthy aging, and to test interventions that have the potential to improve healthspan. In this talk, I will discuss our progress in carrying out large-scale epidemiological analysis of existing datasets, including our novel findings on the associations between sterilization and health outcomes in dogs. I will present results from an ongoing set of intervention studies in companion dogs using a drug shown to slow aging in lab animals, and discuss the power of the Dog Aging Project to identify cohorts for future trials. Finally, I will explore the potential positive impact of the Dog Aging Project as an Open Science resource on the canine oncology community.

Objectives

Synopsis:
Long-term longitudinal studies of aging in humans have taught us a tremendous amount about the environmental and genetic risk factors for a wide range of diseases. But for most of these diseases, including cancer, by far the greatest risk is not genes or the environment, but age itself. For many diseases, the effect of age on risk is orders of magnitude greater than all other known risk factors combined. Thus, many researchers study the basic mechanisms of aging in the hope of understanding the underlying mechanisms that lead to this dramatic increase in risk of disease with age. Given the tremendous diversity among breeds not only in morphology and behavior, but also in patterns of age-related morbidity and mortality, companion dogs offer us an unprecedented opportunity to understand how and why genes, environment and age all combine to shape risks of age-related diseases. With this in mind, The Dog Aging Project (http://www.dogagingproject.com) is dedicated to developing the companion dog as a powerful model both to identify the genetic and environmental determinants of healthy aging, and to test interventions that have the potential to improve healthspan. In this talk, I will discuss our progress in carrying out large-scale epidemiological analysis of existing datasets, including our novel findings on the associations between sterilization and health outcomes in dogs. I will present results from an ongoing set of intervention studies in companion dogs using a drug shown to slow aging in lab animals, and discuss the power of the Dog Aging Project to identify cohorts for future trials. Finally, I will explore the potential positive impact of the Dog Aging Project as an Open Science resource on the canine oncology community.
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Daniel Promislow - Dr. Promislow is a Professor in the Departments of Pathology and Biology at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, where he studies the basic biology of aging. He also serves as Associate Director of the UW Institute for Public Health Genetics in the School of Public Health. He is the Founding Director of the Canine Longevity Consortium, and co-Director of the Dog Aging Project. His other UW affiliations include the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, the eScience Institute, the Harborview Injury Prevention Research Center, and the Institute for Translational Health Sciences. Dr. Promislow is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 0.25 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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