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Thirty years of Discovery with companion animal Cancers with a View Toward the Future

Thirty years of Discovery with companion animal Cancers with a View Toward the Future

Thirty years of Discovery with companion animal Cancers with a View Toward the Future

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

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Normal Price: FREE $ 12.50

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Launch date: 14 Apr 2015

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Reference: 150684

$ FREE $ FREE $ FREE
$ 12.50 $ 12.50 $ 12.50
Thirty years of Discovery with companion animal Cancers with a View Toward the Future
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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

In 1979 Dr. Edward Gillette and I initiated the first randomized trial comparing the efficacy of radiotherapy alone vs. radiotherapy with hyperthermia for the treatment of canine oral carcinomas. This trial was funded by the NIH. This trial was the first to show the potential benefit of thermoradiotherapy, indicating significant evidence for improved local tumor control, while maintaining an equivalent level of normal tissue toxicity. Since coming to Duke in 1984, I had the privilege of collaborating with CSU and NCSU faculty for another 28 years on NIH funded clinical trials. During that time we made major discoveries about how to optimize delivery of hyperthermia, particularly in combination with radiotherapy and liposomal drugs, using pet dogs with cancer, as models for human cancer. In this lecture, I will review some of the more recent major discoveries made in these three decades, emphasizing their translational impact. In particular, I will emphasize the contributions made in studies of tumor hypoxia, functional imaging and genomics.
It was my career goal to be involved in such trials, but little did I know that the NIH was interested, too. We were fortunate to have these trials funded by NCI and ACS for >25 years. Given the more recent emergence of One Medicine as a concept, we were truly in the infancy of providing understanding of the value of canine cancer as a model for human cancer.

Objectives

Objectives
In this lecture, I will review some of the more recent major discoveries made in these three decades, emphasizing their translational impact. In particular, I will emphasize the contributions made in studies of tumor hypoxia, functional imaging and genomics.
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Mark Dewhirst, DVM, PhD is the Gustavo S. Montana Professor of Radiation Oncology and Vice Director for Basic Science in the Duke Cancer Institute. Dr. Dewhirst has research interests in tumor hypoxia, angiogenesis, hyperthermia and drug transport. He has spent 30 years studying causes and consequences of tumor hypoxia.Dr. Dewhirst was recently named a Fellow in the AAAS. Dr. Dewhirst has well over 500 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters and reviews, with >20,000 citations and an H-index of 73. He was awarded the Failla Medal and Lecture from the Radiation Research Society in 2008, the Eugene Robinson award for excellence hyperthermia research in 1992 and a similar award from the European Society for Hyperthermic Oncology in 2009. He was named a fellow of ASTRO in 2009 and was awarded the prestigious Gold Medal from the same society in 2012. He is a Senior Editor of Cancer Research and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Hyperthermia. In 2011 he was appointed the first Associate Dean of Faculty Mentoring in the Duke School of Medicine.He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1971 with a degree in Chemistry and Colorado State University in 1975 and 1979 with DVM and PhD degrees, respectively.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 0.50 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

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