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Cancer Drugs on the Horizon

Cancer Drugs on the Horizon

Cancer Drugs on the Horizon

Veterinary Cancer Society
Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

$FREE $ FREE $ FREE

$25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00

$ FREE $ FREE $ FREE
$ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00
Normal Price: FREE $25.00

Review:

Launch date: 15 Apr 2015

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 20 Apr 2016

Reference: 150691

Exam is embedded in the course
No Exam Available

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Radiation therapy is an effective treatment of localized cancers and palliation of pain and suffering of subjects with incurable cancer. We have several challenges to consider when advancing the field of radiation oncology. First, radiation therapy can be used as ablative (tissue destructive) therapy such as with stereotactic body radiation ablation and Gamma Knife therapy. Tissue ablative radiotherapy can be combined with immunotherapy to enhance the systemic immune response. Secondly, molecular targeted radiosensitizers are slowly commercialized by pharmaceutical industry because subjects are only treated for 6-7 weeks resulting in an insufficient business model for big pharmaceutical companies. Likewise, molecular targeted radioprotectors have not been developed because of minimal revenue projections during the short course of radiotherapy. Veterinary cancer care provides us with opportunities to improve drug development because of the lower financial risk. This key note address will provide an overview of the opportunities for cancer drug development to improve the efficacy of radiotherapy. We will review the literature regarding combination of radiotherapy with immunotherapy, molecular targeted radiosensitization and radioprotection in radiation oncology.

The molecular targets for radiation protection include Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β which prevents radiation induced apoptosis, and Protein Phosphatase 2A. The cancer antigens that are used for antibody development include Glucose Reactive Protein 78 and Tax Interacting Protein 1. We have learned that these antigens are induced during cytotoxic therapy which provides novel antigens for cancer antibody development. New anti-angiogenic molecular targets include Phospholipase A2 and Autotaxin. Small molecular inhibitors of these enzymes are not only anti-angiogenic, but also enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy. An overview of these new molecular targets in cancer drug development will be provided during the key note address.

Objectives

Objectives
This keynote address will provide an overview of the opportunities for cancer drug development to improve the efficacy of radiotherapy. We will review the literature regarding combination of radiotherapy with immunotherapy, molecular targeted radiosensitization and radioprotection in radiation oncology.
Veterinary Cancer Society

Author Information Play Video Bio

Veterinary Cancer Society
on behalf of Missouri Veterinary Medical Association

Dr. Dennis Hallahan is the McDonnell Distinguished Professor and Head of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Washington University. Dr Hallahan has treated patients with cancer using radiotherapy for 25 years. His primary focus is in drug development for treatment of cancer. Dr. Hallahan has prioritized several small compounds, peptides and antibodies that will now enter clinical trials. Dr. Hallahan has a laboratory with 20 members including students, fellows, residents, junior faculty and research assistants that are all focused upon the drugs proposed in this application. Dr. Hallahan is in the Leadership Committee of Siteman Cancer Center and oversees all research conducted in the Department of Radiation Oncology. He has served as the Principal Investigator for many clinical investigations and over a dozen R01 grants from the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Hallahan is a co-founder of Genvec, Inc. He developed the radiation inducible gene therapy that proceeded through Phase III clinical trials. This drug, TNFerade, is planned to enter additional Phase III trials in the treatment of cancer. Dr. Hallahan is also the Principal Investigator on a Phase I clinical trial studying radiation protecting drugs. With Cumberland Emerging Technologies, Dr. Hallahan was the PI on STTRs (small business grants) to develop and study radiation protecting drugs for cancer. These topical agents are designed to protect normal tissues of patients receiving radiation therapy. Dr. Hallahan is the founder of Medical Guidance Systems, Inc. and RadTargX, which are St. Louis based companies that focus on drug delivery systems for cancer therapy. Dr. Hallahan has developed several drugs that have entered Phase I through Phase III clinical trials. These drugs have been developed through biotechnology startup companies and through collaborations with pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Hallahan has had over 50 national and international patents issued or applied for (pending).

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Missouri Veterinary Medical Association
  • 1.00 Hours -
    Exam Attempts: 3
    -
    Exam Pass Rate: 50

Faculty and Disclosures

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