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Peripheral Vascular Disease of the Lower Extremity

Peripheral Vascular Disease of the Lower Extremity

Peripheral Vascular Disease of the Lower Extremity

Arnold S. Rappoport M.D.
Arnold S. Rappoport M.D.
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
Normal Price: $10.00 $10.00

Review:

Launch date: 06 Oct 2017
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 14 Mar 2018

Reference: 184907

This course is no longer available

Exam is embedded in the course
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Latest User Comments

Ms ANH PHUONG LE (24 Jan 2018)
i enjoy the course, wish there are more pictures for examples.

I would like to...

Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

The definition of peripheral vascular disease is insufficient arterial blood flow to the extremities. The most common cause for peripheral vascular disease is atherosclerosis, which is primarily found in arteries (also called arteriosclerosis). Inflammatory diseases of arteries may also cause peripheral vascular disease, but these are rare, the most noteworthy one being called Buerger’s disease (named after Dr. Buerger – also called thromboangiitis obliterans).

The more common risk factors for the development of peripheral vascular disease are diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cigarette smoking as well as a family history of hyperlipidemia. There are two broad categories in which patients with peripheral vascular disease present:

Claudication is where pain is experienced while walking and stops when the patient is at rest. The pain occurs in a muscle group where the supply of blood is not enough to meet the metabolic demands of exercise or activity.

Ischemia is the more severe form, which manifests as pain while at rest in bed. The decrease in blood supply is so significant that it results in poor nutrition to the skin of the feet and legs resulting in coldness, discoloration, skin breakdown, ulceration and ultimately gangrene.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Explain the difference between claudication and ischemia.

2. Describe the basic anatomy of the arterial tree as it branches off the aortic arch and the abdominal aorta.

3. Compare and contrast the risks and benefits of angiography and identify in which patients the procedure is contraindicated.

4. Describe the types of disorders encountered in the lower extremities of patients who demonstrate peripheral vascular disease.
Arnold S. Rappoport M.D.

Author Information Play Video Bio

Arnold S. Rappoport M.D.
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Dr. Arnold S. Rappoport is a Board Certified Radiologist and is currently an active Interventional Radiologist at Memorial Medical Center in Long Beach, California. He is also an Associate Adjunct Professor for the Department of Radiological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine Medical Center.

Dr. Rappoport is a Fellow of the American Board of Radiology and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Radiology. He is also a member of the Society for Cardiovascular Interventional Radiology and the Western Angiographic Society. He has published numerous articles in peer-review journals and has presented lectures regarding Interventional Radiology across the country and internationally.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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User Reviews (1)

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Ms ANH PHUONG LE (24 Jan 2018)
i enjoy the course, wish there are more pictures for examples.

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