Saving changes...

Done

Error

Congenital Hydrocephalus and Ventriculomegaly

Congenital Hydrocephalus and Ventriculomegaly

Congenital Hydrocephalus and Ventriculomegaly

Susan Riordan, RN, RDMS & Jonathan Weeks, M.D.
Susan Riordan, RN, RDMS & Jonathan Weeks, M.D.
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
Normal Price: $10.00 $10.00

Review:

Launch date: 05 Oct 2017
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 27 Jul 2018

Reference: 184901

This course is no longer available

Exam is embedded in the course
No preview available
No Exam Available

Latest User Comments

I would like to...

Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Using epidemiologic surveys, the incidence of congenital hydrocephalus ranges from 0.3 to 1.5 per 1000 births in the United States. Hydrocephalus refers to an increased intracranial content of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). The term is generally used to refer to a situation in which an abnormal accumulation of cerebral spinal fluid results in an enlargement of the ventricular system.

The term ""ventriculomegaly"" is often used synonymously with hydrocephalus. However, ventriculomegaly means enlargement of the ventricles, which may be caused by increased intraventricular pressure secondary to obstruction of cerebral spinal fluid flow (for which ""hydrocephalus"" is the proper term), or it may be the result of passive enlargement caused by atrophy of the brain parenchyma. With atrophy of brain parenchyma, the ventricles basically enlarge to fill the voided space. Over time, it has become increasingly clear that a variable degree of enlargement of the ventricles is shared by a wide variety of anomalies different from obstructive hydrocephalus and that ventriculomegaly can be regarded as a potential marker of abnormal brain development.

Hydrocephalus almost always is due to an obstruction of cerebral spinal fluid flow, resulting in an increase in intracranial pressure. In rare instances, it may be the result of an increase in cerebral spinal fluid production or a relative decrease in the amount of CSF resorption. Hydrocephalus is said to be ""isolated"" when the fetus is free from anomalies that are not the direct result of the ventricular enlargement and intracranial pressure.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Discuss the incidence and definition of hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly, and how cerebral spinal fluid is formed, its flow, and its reabsorption.

2. Describe how the ventricles can grow to an abnormal size and the three major types of hydrocephalus.

3. Discuss the ultrasound findings and potential methods for making a diagnosis of hydrocephalus / ventriculomegaly.

4. Discuss the prognosis and some of the management options that may be utilized once the diagnosis is made.
Susan Riordan, RN, RDMS & Jonathan Weeks, M.D.

Author Information Play Video Bio

Susan Riordan, RN, RDMS & Jonathan Weeks, M.D.
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Susan Riordan received her Bachelors degree in nursing in 1979 and has been a full time nurse for 21 years. She has worked in labor and delivery, postpartum, and the newborn nursery. She has been a high-risk obstetrical sonographer for the past 10 years and received her RDMS in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1997. She currently works at Norton Suburban Hospital in Maternal-Fetal Medicine under the direction of Dr. Jonathan Weeks.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

null

User Reviews (0)

Go Back

Loading...


Saving changes...

Done

Error