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Anti-infective Drug Use in Obstetrics - Part III

Anti-infective Drug Use in Obstetrics - Part III

Anti-infective Drug Use in Obstetrics - Part III

Gerald G. Briggs, B.Pharm.
Gerald G. Briggs, B.Pharm.
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

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Launch date: 04 Oct 2017
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Last updated: 11 Jan 2018

Reference: 184882

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

This article is a continuation of Parts I & II. Again, for each drug that is discussed, the pregnancy risk factor category (as defined by the Food and Drug Administration) is shown in parentheses. To allow for easy reference as these drugs are discussed the categories are as follows:

Category A: Controlled studies in women fail to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and animal studies (if performed) also show no risk and thus, the possibility of fetal harm appears to be remote.

Category B: Either – No controlled studies in women have been done, but animal studies show no harm OR animal studies suggest a potential for harm, but controlled studies in women do not show harm.

Category C: Either – studies in animals suggest a potential for harm, and controlled studies in women have not been done OR no animal studies or human studies have been done – The potential benefit from use should exceed the potential for risk.

Category D: There is positive evidence that human fetal risk exists; however, the benefits of use may still outweigh the risk (for example, some anti-convulsive drugs).

Category X: There is positive evidence that human fetal risk exists and this risk clearly outweighs any potential benefit from using the drug. Thus the drug is contraindicated.

As stated in Parts I and II, the majority of drugs are classified as category C because of the overall lack of studies in pregnant women.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Describe the potential concerns of using certain anti-helminthic drugs and anti-fungal agents during pregnancy or lactation.

2. Discuss the potential concerns of using pentamidine during pregnancy or lactation.

3. Describe the potential concerns of using the various anti-tuberculosis drugs during pregnancy or lactation."
Gerald G. Briggs, B.Pharm.

Author Information Play Video Bio

Gerald G. Briggs, B.Pharm.
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Gerald G. Briggs is a Pharmacist Clinical Specialist in the Perinatal Center of Women's Hospital, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center in Long Beach, California. He is also a Clinical Professor of Pharmacy for the University of California, San Francisco and an Adjunct Associate Clinical Professor of Pharmacy at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

He is the primary author of the textbook entitled Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation, currently in its 6th Edition, copyright 2001, Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He also has several publications in peer-review medical journals and has lectured at many institutions across the United States and Canada regarding the use of drugs in pregnancy and lactation.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

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