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Amniocentesis

Amniocentesis

Amniocentesis

Craig V. Towers M.D., F.A.C.O.G
Craig V. Towers M.D., F.A.C.O.G
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

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$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
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Launch date: 27 Sep 2017
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 11 Nov 2018

Reference: 184851

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Mrs EILEEN CAVANAGH (11 Nov 2018)
Interesting and informative information

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

The first amniocentesis procedures were reported by Von Schatz, Lambl, and Prochownick in the 1870’s and early 1880’s. These early procedures were used to relieve patients that were suffering from severe polyhydramnios. In 1930, Menees reported performing the procedure on pregnant women for the purpose of amniography.

The main focus of the amniocentesis changed to that of a diagnostic procedure in the mid 1950’s. These early procedures were for fetal gender determination based in part on the research of the Canadian anatomist, Murray Barr, who described the “barr body” in 1949. When more than one X-chromosome is present, one is usually active and the other is inactivated. The inactivated X-chromosome forms a chromatin mass called a barr body. The sex chromosome makeup for females is two X’s and for males is an X and a Y. Therefore, females will have a barr body and males do not. In 1956, Fuchs and Riis reported performing amniocentesis procedures to determine fetal sex by analysis of the presence or absence of the barr body.

In the mid 1960’s, Steele, Bregs, and Nadler described the performing of amniocentesis procedures in order to culture cells for a full chromosome analysis and also the measurement of alphafetoprotein (AFP). Hence the birth of the genetic amniocentesis. Since the late 1960’s, amniocentesis has become a very common obstetrical procedure, not only for genetic evaluation, but also for diagnosing other issues such as infections, fetal maturity, relieving polyhydramnios, and in analyzing Rh sensitized women.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Describe how the amniocentesis procedure has changed over the years and the best approach currently for performing the procedure to minimize complications.

2. Explain the various risks and complications associated with amniocentesis.

3. Explain the significance of brown colored fluid that may be obtained at the time of genetic amniocentesis and the use of amniocentesis in Rh negative women.

4. Describe how intra-amniotic bleeding that can occur at the amniocentesis site, may appear sonographically.
Craig V. Towers M.D., F.A.C.O.G

Author Information Play Video Bio

Craig V. Towers M.D., F.A.C.O.G
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Dr. Towers is currently Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at University of Tennessee Medical Center Knoxville in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. He is still clinically active managing numerous high-risk pregnancies. He is also actively involved in research with over 90 publications in major medical journals. Though his research has spanned many areas in obstetrics, he has primary interests in drugs in pregnancy, infections in pregnancy, fetal heart monitoring, bleeding in pregnancy, and fetal lung maturity.

He has authored a book for consumers regarding the safety of over-the-counter medications that are used in treating the common cold entitled “I’m Pregnant & I Have a Cold – Are Over-the-Counter Drugs Safe to Use?” published by RBC Press, Inc. He is also one of the new Editors of the reference book for clinical care providers entitled “Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation, published by Wolters & Kluwer.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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User Reviews (1)

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Mrs EILEEN CAVANAGH (11 Nov 2018)
Interesting and informative information

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