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Eating Disorders - Part II - Diagnosis and Treatment of Teens

Eating Disorders - Part II - Diagnosis and Treatment of Teens

Eating Disorders - Part II - Diagnosis and Treatment of Teens

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

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Launch date: 22 Sep 2017
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 11 Jan 2018

Reference: 184826

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Eating disorders are most successfully treated when diagnosed early but are not that easy to diagnose early. Teenagers with eating disorders tend to deny they have a problem when confronted by family, friends, and school professionals or by a physician’s diagnosis. Many anorexics do not receive medical and/or psychological care until they are dangerously thin and malnourished. Bulimic teens can hide their symptoms because they usually have a normal body weight, thereby delaying help until they reach 30 to 40 years of age. For males with eating disorders, early access to treatment is more difficult because anorexia and bulimia are less common; but there is a suggestion that the prevalence of these syndromes in males is increasing. Teens often conceal their symptoms, thus interviews with family members should be part of the assessment. Several other factors complicate the chances of early diagnosis, which include the distrust that teens have of adults and authority figures, a need for privacy, not talking due to fear of revealing vulnerabilities, and fear of parental involvement and punishment.

Important Notes: There is a diagnostic criterion for eating disorders called ""not otherwise specified"" (or NOS), which excludes anorexia nervosa, bulimia, or binge eating. NOS is not covered in this article. Obesity is also an approved medical diagnosis but is not an eating disorder diagnosis.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Discuss the diagnostic criteria and differential diagnosis for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating/compulsive overeating.

2. Describe the medical complications that can be seen with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating/compulsive overeating.

3. Explain the components of assessing and treating anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating/compulsive overeating.
Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist

Author Information Play Video Bio

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist, has been a Registered Nurse for over 18 years. She has extended her education into forensic nursing, criminal profiling, and psychopathy receiving a Certificate as a Forensic Nurse Specialist. She has over 16 years experience in public health and home care nursing.

Colleen has been an author of educational material for St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, Florida. She has also lectured on a variety of topics at numerous nursing symposiums and conferences across the country. She is on the Editorial Board for "Home Health Aide Digest" and "Private Duty Homecare" publications.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

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