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Eating Disorders - Part I - Prevalence and Screening of Teens

Eating Disorders - Part I - Prevalence and Screening of Teens

Eating Disorders - Part I - Prevalence and Screening of Teens

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

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Launch date: 21 Sep 2017
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Last updated: 11 Jan 2018

Reference: 184818

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

The word ""adolescence"" is derived from the Latin word adolescere, which means, ""to grow up"" – describing the period in a person's life between childhood and maturity. So much occurs during adolescence and I would predict that most of us would not want to repeat it. Adolescents / teenagers are concerned with their body image, peer acceptance, self-identity and independence. Girls tend to be weight-conscious and can be greatly influenced by the media and their peers regarding sociability. Boys tend to vie for muscle development, weight lifting strength, athletic ability, and physical power. Both sexes have uncertain feelings that arise related to their body image and their desirability according to themselves and their peers; these uncertainties can lead to eating disorders with devastating effects. This article focuses on eating disorders that can afflict teens during these ""roller-coaster"" years.

Life events and stressors can cause minor and transient changes in eating habits void of medical or social complications – these are often referred to as ""disordered eating"". But for a conservative estimate, 1% to 2% of our teens (mostly females) will develop an eating disorder. For teens with eating disorders, their development and life is complicated by physiological and psychosocial changes associated with starvation, binge eating, purging, and weight fluctuations. Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and Binge Eating are classified as psychiatric illnesses and are the three most common eating disorders. These disorders cause mental preoccupation and behaviors about one’s body and the foods consumed, which can impact health, socialization, school, and for some may lead to death. The focus for the healthcare team including nurses is not on diet or nutrition but rather on the illness and the underlying pathology. Eating disorders are complex problems that develop from a variety of causes. Once an eating disorder develops it has a propensity to create a self-perpetuating cycle of physical, emotional, and psychosocial destruction requiring professional help. Unfortunately eating disorders can and often do go undetected and untreated.

In the past, eating disorders were typecasted as affecting only white affluent women but that is no longer substantiated. Eating disorders cross all ethnic groups and socioeconomic classes. Both males and females are at risk with adolescent and young adult women having the highest risk. About 85% to 90% of anorexia nervosa and bulimia cases occur in women, and an estimated 60% of binge eating cases occur in women. It is interesting to note that nearly 2 million people in the United States have an eating disorder or a borderline condition, which is triple the number of people living with AIDS (according to the US Department of Health and Human Services, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report 1998 about 665,000 people are living with AIDS).

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Discuss the causative factors associated with eating disorders.

2. Describe the warning signs and behavioral evidence that can be seen in teens that are at risk for eating disorders.

3. Describe the components of screening for eating disorders and how to calculate an approximate ideal body weight.
Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist

Author Information Play Video Bio

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist, has been a Registered Nurse for over 18 years. She has extended her education into forensic nursing, criminal profiling, and psychopathy receiving a Certificate as a Forensic Nurse Specialist. She has over 16 years experience in public health and home care nursing.

Colleen has been an author of educational material for St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, Florida. She has also lectured on a variety of topics at numerous nursing symposiums and conferences across the country. She is on the Editorial Board for "Home Health Aide Digest" and "Private Duty Homecare" publications.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

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