Saving changes...

Done

Error

Hepatitis A - Update and an Overview of Viral Hepatitis

Hepatitis A - Update and an Overview of Viral Hepatitis

Hepatitis A - Update and an Overview of Viral Hepatitis

Craig V. Towers, M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings, RN, BSN, MSN
Craig V. Towers, M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings, RN, BSN, MSN
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
Normal Price: $10.00 $10.00

Review:

Launch date: 19 Sep 2017
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 11 Jan 2018

Reference: 184798

This course is no longer available

Exam is embedded in the course
No preview available
No Exam Available

Latest User Comments

I would like to...

Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Disorders of the liver have a wide spectrum and are commonly seen in medicine. Table 1 gives a differential for liver disorders, one of which is hepatitis. By definition, hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver that is usually caused by a virus, drug, or toxin. When evaluating a patient with a diagnosis of possible hepatitis, obtaining a thorough history is imperative. This history should include any travel (outside and inside the United States), any use of drugs, medications, or herbs, any exposure to environmental toxins, and recent dietary intake. Drug and toxin induced causes for hepatitis are common. Table 2 lists some of the more common drugs and toxins that have been associated with a hepatitis-like reaction.

Viral induced hepatitis has always been a complex subject that has often resulted in confusion. At the present time, there are 5 distinct primary viruses that can cause hepatitis and possibly 2 others. In addition, many other viruses including cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein Barr virus (EBV), herpes virus, and coxsackieviruses can also produce a hepatitis-like appearance. The five main viruses have been designated with letters and are hepatitis A, B, C, D and E. The other 2 potential viruses are G and TT, but the full extent of these infections has not been completely determined.

Regardless of the viral type, most patients with viral hepatitis are asymptomatic. If symptoms do appear, they often are misdiagnosed as a viral flu syndrome. These symptoms include anorexia, nausea and vomiting, fatigue, myalgias and a low-grade fever. Only the more affected cases develop jaundice with light colored stools, dark urine and right upper quadrant pain consistent with a classic diagnosis of hepatitis. Though rare, severe cases of hepatitis can lead to acute liver failure resulting in coagulopathy, delirium, and even death.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Describe the differential for liver disorders seen in medicine and list some of the drugs and toxins that can produce liver dysfunction.

2. Discuss the impact of Hepatitis A infections on healthcare and the diagnostic work-up of the patient infected with this virus.

3. Describe the different ways in which the Hepatitis A virus can be transmitted between adults as well as children.

4. Discuss the potential treatment options for Hepatitis A, the effectiveness of immunoprophylaxis, and recommendations for immunoprophylaxis.
Craig V. Towers, M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings, RN, BSN, MSN

Author Information Play Video Bio

Craig V. Towers, M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings, RN, BSN, MSN
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Patricia D. Hastings has been a registered nurse involved in clinical practice for more than 25 years. She currently is a Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner for Desert Mountain Obstetrics & Gynecology Group. Prior to this, she was the Clinical Director of Obstetrics and Women’s Services at John C. Lincoln-North Mountain Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona and was a Case Manager for Vista Care Hospice. She is a member of AWHONN and is a certified Fetal Heart Monitoring Instructor. She is also a member of the ANA and is participating in the Advanced Practice Chapter of the Arizona Nurses Association.

She received her BSN and then her MSN from Wichita State University followed by a postmaster’s Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner Certification from Arizona State University. She has provided several presentations regarding nursing concerns related to Women’ Health Care and has frequently lectured on normal and high-risk obstetrical issues. She has practiced clinically in Kansas, California, and Arizona.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

null

User Reviews (0)

Go Back

Loading...


Saving changes...

Done

Error