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Hepatitis G, Hepatitis TT and Hepatitis Non-A,B,C,D,E,G,TT

Hepatitis G, Hepatitis TT and Hepatitis Non-A,B,C,D,E,G,TT

Hepatitis G, Hepatitis TT and Hepatitis Non-A,B,C,D,E,G,TT

Craig V. Towers M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings RN, BSN, MSN
Craig V. Towers M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings RN, BSN, MSN
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

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Review:

Launch date: 19 Sep 2017
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 11 Jan 2018

Reference: 184797

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Viruses that primarily infect the liver, producing hepatic dysfunction, jaundice, light colored stools, and abnormal liver function tests, are commonly known as hepatitis viruses. The initial two viruses identified were called Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B. Everything else was essentially called Non-A Non-B viral hepatitis, for which it was thought that two distinct forms existed – one that was similar to A (with an oral-fecal route of transmission) and the other that was similar to B (primarily transmitted percutaneously).

However, the intense work that has occurred in the area of viral study (pushed by the disease AIDS) has resulted in the discovery of many different viral genomes of RNA and DNA composition. This has been true for the hepatitis viruses, as well. No other hepatitis viruses were really identified until Hepatitis C was discovered in 1989 (actually Hepatitis D was discovered in 1977, but is considered a defective virus that cannot exist without the presence of Hepatitis B). ""E"" was reported in 1990. For some reason, we skipped F and now we possibly have two more – G and TT. This article talks about these two new viruses and covers the issue of whether they are really pathologic or not.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Describe the route of transmission, the prevalence, and the potential significance of hepatitis G.

2. Describe the route of transmission, the prevalence, and the potential significance of hepatitis TT.

3. Discuss the possible causes for hepatitis other than hepatitis A through G and TT.
Craig V. Towers M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings RN, BSN, MSN

Author Information Play Video Bio

Craig V. Towers M.D., & Patricia D. Hastings RN, BSN, MSN
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Dr. Towers is currently Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at University of Tennessee Medical Center Knoxville in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. He is still clinically active managing numerous high-risk pregnancies. He is also actively involved in research with over 90 publications in major medical journals. Though his research has spanned many areas in obstetrics, he has primary interests in drugs in pregnancy, infections in pregnancy, fetal heart monitoring, bleeding in pregnancy, and fetal lung maturity.

He has authored a book for consumers regarding the safety of over-the-counter medications that are used in treating the common cold entitled “I’m Pregnant & I Have a Cold – Are Over-the-Counter Drugs Safe to Use?” published by RBC Press, Inc. He is also one of the new Editors of the reference book for clinical care providers entitled “Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation, published by Wolters & Kluwer.

Patricia D. Hastings has been a registered nurse involved in clinical practice for more than 25 years. She currently is a Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner for Desert Mountain Obstetrics & Gynecology Group. Prior to this, she was the Clinical Director of Obstetrics and Women’s Services at John C. Lincoln-North Mountain Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona and was a Case Manager for Vista Care Hospice. She is a member of AWHONN and is a certified Fetal Heart Monitoring Instructor. She is also a member of the ANA and is participating in the Advanced Practice Chapter of the Arizona Nurses Association.

She received her BSN and then her MSN from Wichita State University followed by a postmaster’s Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner Certification from Arizona State University. She has provided several presentations regarding nursing concerns related to Women’ Health Care and has frequently lectured on normal and high-risk obstetrical issues. She has practiced clinically in Kansas, California, and Arizona.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

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