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PART I - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space

PART I - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space

PART I - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space

Sky Factory
Sky Factory
on behalf of The British Institute of Interior Design

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Normal Price: FREE FREE

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Launch date: 25 Mar 2019
Expiry Date: 29 Apr 2022

Last updated: 21 Jun 2019

Reference: 190086

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Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

In this course we explore the impact of deep plan buildings on human performance.
Studies have confirmed that interiors that isolate occupants from a meaningful visual connection to nature dampen cognitive function and wellness.

Part I, introduces how our biological experience of daylight impacts our cognitive function. We review the biology of visual processing and its circadian dimension. We analyze how tunable lighting systems that reduce the natural light of the sky to irradiance and color temperature are inevitably limited.

The environmental framework of sky must be introduced if the third essential element of natural light—its spatial nature—is to be present.

Part I also covers how the spatial context in which we perceive daylight presents an opportunity to engage the spatial maps of previously experienced environments stored by our memory. By mimicking these spatial maps, designers can make space with the proper contextual and environmental cues.

Objectives

The Nature of Dayligfht
Discuss why reducing daylight’s fundamental attributes to irradiance (brightness) and color temperature—forgoes daylight’s spatial nature across the sky.
Detecting Daylight
Explore the role circadian photoreceptors play in regulating our biological clocks and why the environmental context in which our physiology detects daylight—under the sky—may play a previously unacknowledged role in generating a restorative effect.
Spatial Memory
Learn how our sensorimotor system and memory share the same wetware (neural pathways) to perceive and navigate our environment, making memory a neural repository of spatial maps.
Sky Factory

Author Information Play Video Bio

Sky Factory
on behalf of The British Institute of Interior Design

David Navarrete MS, MBA manages Sky Factory's research partnerships with healthcare organizations interested in cognitive biophilia studies. He has contributed research articles to Human Spaces, a global forum on biophilic design, and Conscious Cities Journal, a new field of research/practice focused on the neurobiology of design. He is the co-author of Sky Factory’s new RIBA / BIID / USGBC CPD course, The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space. The abstract based on these findings will be presented at the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture (ANFA), at the Salk Institute, in September, 2018.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Bill Witherspoon, co-author

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

Sky Factory is a design studio that custom manufactures virtual skylights and windows. However, the peer-reviewed studies resulting from the company’s collaborative research partnerships have earned the recognition of distinguished professional organizations like the Design & Health International Academy, the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA), and Planetree International, a global patient experience advocacy community. Sky Factory does not influence or play any role in the studies’ execution, data gathering and analysis, report drafting or in the submission process to peer-reviewed journals.

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