Saving changes...

Done

Error

Beyond Fairness

Beyond Fairness

Beyond Fairness

Yannis Pitsiladis and Joanne Harper
Yannis Pitsiladis and Joanne Harper
on behalf of British Association of Sport & Exercise Medicine

FREE
FREE
FREE

FREE
FREE
FREE

null FREE
FREE
FREE
null FREE
FREE
FREE
Normal Price: FREE FREE

Review:

Launch date: 19 Apr 2018

Expiry Date:

Last updated: 11 May 2018

Reference: 188322

Exam is embedded in the course
No preview available
No Exam Available

Latest User Comments

I would like to...

Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

Description

Presentation at the BASEM Spring Conference 2018

Objectives

Implications of a third gender for elite sports
At least eleven nations or states allow a third legal gender. During this presentation, the implications of a third gender for elite sport will be outlined and a roadmap presented to guide the implementation of rules for the inclusion for transgender and intersex athletes. One should look at sex and/or gender- based qualities that are important for athletic performance when determining sporting categories for these athletes. The authors propose that evidence-based scientific research be the foundation for decisions on participation in sex-segregated sports. Furthermore, the authors suggest that the concept of an athletic gender should be established in order to facilitate this segregation.
Yannis Pitsiladis and Joanne Harper

Author Information Play Video Bio

Yannis Pitsiladis and Joanne Harper
on behalf of British Association of Sport & Exercise Medicine

Yannis P Pitsiladis, BSc., MMEDSci., PhD, FACSM
Professor Yannis Pitsiladis has an established history of research into the importance of lifestyle and genetics for human health and performance. Following 15 years at the University of Glasgow, Scotland where he created the largest known DNA biobank from world-class athletes, he was appointed (in 2013) Professor of Sport and Exercise Science and Director of the FIMS Reference Collaborating Centre of Sports Medicine for Anti-Doping Research at the University of Brighton. Current research priority is the application of “omics” (i.e. genomics, transcriptomics,
metabolomics and proteomics) to the detection of drugs in sport with particular reference to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo), blood doping and testosterone. Research undertaken in the FIMS reference laboratories is having a significant impact in the field of sport science and medicine. Two primary examples are the SUB2 marathon project (www.sub2hrs.com) and the Athlome Project (www.athlomeconsortium.org). His most recent research is funded by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), he is currently a member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Medical and Scientific Commission, a member of the Executive Committee and Chair of the Scientific Commission of the International Sports Medicine Federation (FIMS), and has sat on two WADA committees. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and an expert committee pool member of the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). He has published over 150 peer-reviewed papers, written and edited a number of books and has featured in numerous research documentaries (e.g. ESPN, BBC, NHK Japan, CNBC) and popular books (e.g. Bounce, The Sports Gene). Professor Pitsiladis is the founding member of the SUB2 marathon project (www.sub2hrs.com): the SUB2 marathon project is the first dedicated international research initiative made up of specialist multidisciplinary scientists from academia, elite athletes and strategic industry partners with the aim to promote clean marathon running i.e. high performance marathon running without doping. He is also the founding member of the Athlome Project: The main aim of the Athlome project is to characterize the genetics and biology of sport and exercise medicine, as a platform to understanding healthy body function and major chronic disease conditions (e.g., cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes). The Athlome project captures genotype and phenotype data of elite athletes, adaptation to exercise training (in both human and animal models), and muscle-related injuries from excising studies and consortiums worldwide. To achieve this ambitious goal, different approaches are being used including (but not limited to) genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole exome sequencing, RNA sequencing, genotype-phenotype association, and epigenetic analyses. Particular priority is also given to tissue-specific and systemic “omics” analysis (such as transcriptomics in the first instance) to develop personalized medicine applications including “intelligent training” and the discovery of “omics” signatures of doping.

Joanna Harper obtained a master’s degree in medical physics from the University of Western Ontario, and has worked as a medical physicist for more than thirty years. She is also a long-time athletics competitor, first as a young man and later as an older woman. After nine months of hormone therapy, as part of her gender transition, she was running 12% slower. This difference in her running speed led to her ongoing investigation of athletic performance of transgender athletes and the effect of hormone levels on all athletes. She has published several papers on the subject of gender variance and sport.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

Faculty and Disclosures

undefined

Details

You must own the training to change the number

User Reviews (0)

Go Back

Loading...


Saving changes...

Done

Error